Tag Archives: tecnologia

Digital in dentistry
digital guided surgery blog bioservice

When we talk about digital in dentistry, in reality we are not dealing with a completely new issue. Indeed, already in the mid-eighties these technologies were introduced into the practice of dentistry, but in the last decade their use has increased exponentially.
The modern techniques have changed the flow and sequence of work for the development of dental performance by changing the division of tasks and consequently the productivity of the working group.
Time is money! In this case, we can really say that digital technology has changed the work cycle with great benefits in terms of timing and predictability.
Before the advent of technology in the dental field, the sequence of work was marked by essential steps dictated by traditional methods. For those who use them are still the order of the day: the choice of physical supports, materials for the impression, the sending to the laboratory, the physical realization, the waiting while the technicians materialize and send everything back to the doctor, the verification of the work in test and finished (In some cases are necessary to make changes and it is necessary to repeat the operation of the impression). All these steps entail times and costs ranging from travel, to multiple sessions for the patient, and still waits while the dental technician modifies or resumes the work from scratch.
How much is Well-being worth? And how is the operator’s work optimized? What are the advantages to be gained in one’s work?
The fingerprint revolutionizes roles, times and costs.
The transition from conventional techniques to intraoral scanning has changed the experience of traditional impressions. 8Intraoral scanning requires that the impression made is fully digital and that it is processed directly by a software that manages both the oral scanning part and the subsequent improvement phase. All this takes place together with the patient, who becomes aware of the state of his mouth and what he needs thanks to the screen that shows in real time what the dentist is doing. Great professionalism and technology on the part of the doctor, the ability to monitor on screen for the patient, a direct and understandable channel that needs no explanation. Once this phase is over, we proceed to 3D printing, with very limited margins of error compared to the traditional method.
The procedure becomes much more comfortable and streamlined: for the patient who no longer has to suffer the discomfort of the impression with various materials (between coned and, not infrequently, sense of suffocation), for the elimination of consumables such as plaster, alginates, silicones (zero impact also from the environmental point of view), for the absence of errors considered the possibility of managing the digital file, for the shortened times given the elimination of the intermediate procedures of manufacture of the plaster model (also the data acquired through the scanner can be used by the studio to design the prosthesis with CAD/CAM technology).
What is the value of the patient’s time?
The question is rhetorical. Of course, the timing helps to determine the satisfaction of the patient, who will be all the more satisfied the fewer sessions he will have to face. The loss of time is matched by a loss of time in economic terms: work permits, miles from the dental office (if not nearby), transportation, parking, the baby sitter for children at home alone, and all other daily activities that need to be postponed or anticipated to make room for the appointment at the dentist.
And the doctor?
As far as the doctor is concerned, the supply chain is shortened and times are drastically reduced.
The fee: the fee that before seemed to be motivated by the presence of a longer chain (more steps with the laboratory, more frequent sessions), today is justified by the performance itself that has provided upstream an investment “important” to ensure efficiency, comfort and reduced time and on the other hand the learning curve of the professional who needs to learn, improve and master the digital technique.
The change
In conclusion, the process of approaching this reality must not be sudden and forced, the professional must have a clear understanding of how the progress of their study, what are the most requested services and based on the needs of the patient can invest in equipment and software technology most congenial to their business. Amortisation will be all the faster as the service provided by the digital technology chosen will be offered to the patient in an exhaustive manner.
You can’t stop or ignore innovation or manage it or suffer it. This teaches us history. The patient also has the opportunity to verify the information that his doctor provides; it is essential that these are in accordance with the evolution of the state of the art and are not limited to the techniques used by the dentist himself. Today the patient is very well informed even if the amount of information can paradoxically generate the same effect as the lack of information. For this reason, too, the doctor, today more than ever, plays an essential role for the patient, provided that he supplies objective information and always supported by scientific evidence.
In this way, the patient will become the best sounding board to advertise the study, breaking down the hesitations linked to the “value of the performance”.

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More than dentistry
Blog bioservice Matrix

When we talk about innovation in the field of dentistry, our mind leads us straight to think about the epoch-making change that the sector is experiencing thanks to the digitalization of processes, from diagnosis to therapy (Editor’s note). There is another important element whose implications are perhaps even more determined for the patient: the innovation of and in communication. An aspect still little considered by most, but which is radically changing the approach, and consequently the choice, of patients towards the dentist. Today we face one of these many aspects that are hidden behind the generic “Dental Marketing”. We are talking about experiential marketing that is changing the world of dentistry, generating significant benefits, including economic ones, for the patient and the practice.
Let’s cite some cases as examples in which dental practices have decided to innovate by promoting themselves thanks to collateral services that have been able to make a difference and divert patients to “their door”.
First example: Dental studies have thought of providing extra services in addition to what is strictly due to Dentistry and has offered collateral services of great value as allergy tests and for food intolerances, Kinesiology and Osteopathy. In particular, the latter two disciplines are aimed at the balance of the entire body-mind system. The areas examined to rebalance this system include learning, understanding, movement, motor coordination, the perceptual/sensory area and the organic area and promote biochemical, nutritional, physical, structural, mental and emotional balancing. The patient is analysed as an integrated system of devices that are in close dependence on each other. This corresponds to holistic medicine that does not separate mind and body in care. All these disciplines are very much in vogue and appreciated by patients who care about well-being and are attracted by the interpenetration of the two medical spheres. The result has been a much more frequent affiliation and constancy in care.
Second example: Patient services are implemented with a focus on aesthetic and cosmetic dentistry. There is a whole range of patients who ask their dentist for help in improving their “beauty”.
Aesthetic dentistry is the study and realization of dental restorations that restore or improve the aesthetic appearance. Cosmetics, on the other hand, concerns that part of therapies that aim to improve the appearance of one or more dental elements, oral and perioral tissues, the whitening of pigmented teeth, “dental piercings”, etc…
The patient is enormously attracted by everything that orbits around beauty and body care, even when the surgery is a “habit” and not a necessity.

Third example: it contrasts with the old aseptic models of study, which sketch a comfortable waiting room even if most of the time has the appearance of an antechamber of pain not very bright, with ticking clocks, and few contributions to the amusement of the mind.
It is a study that has marked the working activity according to the “passions” of its patients: Monday, after Sunday of sports matches, is completely dedicated to men! The waiting room is a sort of convivial situation in which newspapers, magazines and speeches focus on the criticism of the previous championship day. Time passes quickly and waiting becomes pleasant, to exchange the last impression on this or that other player, result, goal, purchase, card, bet.
Another day of the week is dedicated to women, the waiting room is filled with female voices and the plus is made up of a professional who on site performs the job of beautician and cheers the wait with tricks and enamels.
Other time bands are dedicated to children, who find themselves in a room that takes on the appearance of a room for games in which the thought of the dentist is sweetened by books, colours and many small peers.
By satisfying every age group, following the general lines of common interests, the office has managed to recreate a jovial environment in which sociality and care of the mind fill waiting times and worries.
Conclusions: these three examples of “strategic moves” certainly cost the study a different and “innovative” organization, by virtue of the final yield, the full satisfaction of the patient and his precious time. We can therefore say that varying and expanding our services, aiming at aesthetics, care of the mind and body, following the passions of our patients, guarantees an enormous return in terms of reputation, affiliation and word of mouth.

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Dental technician: a dying job?
dental technician blog bioservice matrix

Technology allows jobs to be carried out that are close to perfection and the workforce is disappearing. Automation is expected to be so high in the near future that a large proportion of many professions will change substantially. The introduction of digital technologies has been the main driver of the current revolution.
The latest report by the McKinsey Global Institute “A Future That Works: Automation, Employment, and Productivity”, confirms this trend: almost half (49%) of the work done today in the world by natural persons can be automated. Even in Italy, where the replacement rate would be between 49% and 51%. This means that more than half of Italian workers, about 11 million people, could be replaced by a machine. The World Economic Forum speaks of a loss of 7.1 million jobs by 2020, offset by a gain of two million jobs. Therefore, the negative balance is five million fewer jobs in the world within the next three years.
Crafts will be the most involved and affected by this orientation, followed by work at the counter as the cashier bank (eclipsed by home and mobile banking) or the insurer (overshadowed by online insurance), but also jobs in the operating room and in public services. The cash machine replaces the cashier, the ATM the bank at the counter, Amazon and Ali Baba (just to name the biggest giants) eclipse salespeople and sales agents, Booking the employees of hotels and travel agencies, email the postman, robots the workers, apps and websites the call centre phone operators, in fast food you order and pay via a touch screen, to buy a dress just click the virtual window on the computer screen and wait at home for delivery. There are many other examples of how computer science and its applications have changed the habits of life and disparate professional environments.
But we are here to talk about another profession that is inevitably seeing its stability falter: the dental technician. The profession of dental technician has always been of fundamental importance within the “dental chain”, so much so that it can be defined as irreplaceable and necessary, a central figure of prosthetic dentistry. To think that this profession and the related manufacture of prostheses are not part of this pressing trend towards the complete automation of production processes is by no means realistic. On the other hand, it is right to remember that all the knowledge, materials and techniques currently in the possession and use of dental laboratories have in turn been conceived and experimented with a view to evolution, as it is logical that they will be replaced and archived to leave room for novelty, in an inexorable life cycle that travels along the line of time and requires willingness to change and learning.
Is there a risk that the dental technician will no longer be the central figure in prosthetic fabrication? Who has been saved from the relentless advance of new technologies that replace the human hand with the “robotic arm” or high-performance machines?
The final question is how ready the dental technician is to take this epochal change, how open he is to new markets. The category was divided in half between those who invested and wanted to experience the future through 3D and those who, frightened by costs, learning curve and scepticism about the evolutionary path of the trade, remained faithful to the traditional technologies always had in their possession (delegating the delegable). Surely those who have managed to get on the “technology cart”, have invested in the future, created collaborations with colleagues and business networks to work in synergy, chosen evolutionary paths for their laboratory in a forward-looking and futuristic business perspective, are now floating and emerging.
First of all, you should be able to get the advance of knowledge and have mastered these new basic skills (the laboratory evolves and with it the figure of the professional), know how to take advantage of the time to make choices and investments, communication and sales strategies, propose and adapt to the changing needs of the market with processes with “high added value”. For example, there are those who have focused on medical devices tailored to the prevention of trauma (e.g. professional mouth guards for athletes, footballers, water polo players), there are those who have ridden the market of aesthetic dentistry or orthodontics. Increasing turnover without being stifled again by what is still called a crisis but which in reality could resemble more to a reticence to the “new landscape” and the “new” demands.
Putting aside what concerns learning and the propensity to change, it is right to point out that the 800 million euros of revenue that moves the Italian market of the dental sector (divided between studios and laboratories) have made the eye fall on the considerable presence of companies and centres that deal with 3D printing and CAD/CAM technologies. A market that no longer sees itself with the dental technician’s laboratory alone, but with the dominant presence of milling and laser melting centres.
As stated by the National Union of Italian Dental Industries, in collaboration with Key-Stone statistics, which commissioned the survey, the data show that 24% of dental laboratories rely on CAD/CAM production centres, preferring this working method to the traditional ones of the dental technician. The number of laboratories that decide to rely on these “digital centres” for the entire production process is increasing: from the design to the production of the works themselves.
It is right that the figure of the dental technician integrates in his professional routine techniques and CAD/CAM technologies, able to facilitate the work and the quality of the executions considering that the dental market is physiologically converting all the techniques and technologies, up to being almost completely digital. But are the historical figures of the supply chain (industries and suppliers, dental practices and dental laboratories) developing combined strategic-entrepreneurial actions? The answer is: not yet enough. It is necessary to ennoble the figure of the dental technician and to privilege the collaboration with the dental practices able to appreciate the quality of the Italian laboratories. At the level of business management, the aggregation of companies can be of great support, both to contain costs and to optimize resources and dominate a complex market.
The new technologies will require the inclusion of more technical and qualified professionals to manage the new systems. The training of professionals will be of fundamental and indispensable importance.

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The dentist at a crossroads between Past and Future
Past and Future of dentistry course bioservice matrix

The dentist at a crossroads between Past and Future

From analogue to digital…From digital to 4.0

The world of dentistry is overwhelmed by a series of changes
and it’s a lot more than we’ve ever seen before. The transition “from analog dentistry to dentistry
digital” is an overwhelming phase of development.
The general economic recovery, even if very weak, is still
accelerating all production processes.
This meeting is intended to be an opportunity to present products,
and strategies to capture the huge potential of the
opportunities that these changes are generating.
Most studies and laboratories are being “seduced” by companies
who often manage to sell them outdated products. In the digital sector, such
products age so quickly that many times it is difficult to find the right
to amortize its costs.
The objective of the course is to provide the information to really make
The opportunities offered by these instruments are rewarding.
they manage to grasp.

Speaker:
Enzo BortoliniAmm. Del. Bioservice S.r.l. – Matrix Implant Line

The meeting will be held in Reggio Emilia on May 10, 2018 at the headquarters of NUOVA DENT.

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