Tag Archives: chirurgia digitale

Ignore, suffer or manage? How to respond to the digital revolution
digital blog bioservice matrix

The insert “Health” of Corriere della Sera dedicates an entire page to digital oral surgery focusing on words such as speed, safety, predictability.
The speeches that appear in the Special Health dedicated to the dental are by illustrious dentists who explain the technologies applied to their profession and that of their employees and colleagues. Here are some of the strengths of the new dental frontier highlighted in the dedicated column:
– the number of appointments that gradually decreases with a relative increase in comfort for the patient (saving in terms of time and money)
– the possibility of speeding up operations that previously required more sessions; this is also a benefit for the dentist who, through the use of technologies, can plan, operate quickly, accurately, precisely and with reduced margins of risk of error
– Surgery and therapy in total safety with the help of personalized surgical templates, designed on the computer and printed in 3D
– reduction of discomfort for the patient
– the scientific evidence in digital, i.e. the proven validity by the International Scientific Society that allows the use of these devices (scanners, cone beam computed tomography, milling machines and 3D printers)
This insert gives an idea of how, for example, guided implant surgery is of great help in aligning the “Craft” to the generalized computerizing of almost all existing jobs with obvious benefits on several fronts.
Digitization: why not?
Digital technologies have changed and will increasingly change the clinical practice of dentistry both from the diagnostic point of view (instrumental investigations such as CT Cone Beam, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography) and in the operational approach (CAD-CAM technologies, intraoral and laboratory scanners, 3D printers).
The digitization of the doctor’s office is an inevitable process, despite this growth does not seem to present relevant data to support the change (for example, the intraoral scanner to take impressions is present in less than 5% of dental practices).
As we mentioned some time ago, the problem of “dissemination” of this important and profitable innovation could be the initial investment and the chronic reluctance to change by the medical sector in question. It is clear that digital is present and applicable in every dental activity, particularly in radiological diagnostics, so much so that the digital design of prosthetic products has been the prerogative of dental technicians for years, and many of them are much more advanced than dentists in this field. Possession of these cutting-edge skills would bring undisputed advantages, especially to the new generations of Dentists and Dental Technicians who find it difficult to emerge in the sea of competition, but the resources seem to them insufficient in the face of the initial investment. But if you think that, in a single day of work, a trained professional can make interventions and products that previously required several sessions, it is obvious how to amortize an initial expense that seemed prohibitive. Reduction of time, costs, waste, but above all satisfied, paying, loyal patients who return, speak proudly of their dentist and expand the circle through word of mouth or sharing of various kinds (e.g.: social networks).
How does the social scenario change inside and outside the dental office? What do these “advanced practices” mean in terms of harmony within the dental practice team? And what benefits does the patient derive from outside?
The digital approach has significantly improved communication in the dental team between the various specialists and dental laboratories: the acquisition of multiple data (CBCT, intra- and extra-oral scans, virtual aesthetic and implant planning) has favoured the interpenetration of executions, integrating them in order to optimize the diagnostic process and monitor over time the changes in oral tissues and restorations.
The introduction of digital systems has also improved the relationship with patients who benefit from greater comfort considering the elimination of impression materials and the advantageous time management; it is possible to verify in real time the correctness of the impressions, to store the data no longer having the need to produce physical models and to carry out three-dimensional digital checks.
The possibility of commenting on the video on the virtual aesthetic planning of the “smile” together with the patients themselves, is certainly a motivational and communicative contribution not to be underestimated. Feeling so involved, patients willingly accept the treatments, limiting misunderstandings (concerning the therapeutic and economic treatment).
Are digital methods within everyone’s reach?
Do they require prolonged learning curves over time or are they easy to acquire?
Logically, it is right to report also some aspects that lead to mistrust in the approach to the “new”: in the common imagination, we speak of rather complex learning curves and significant investments with high costs. Although there is a fund of truth about the onerousness of training and instrumentation, virtual planning equipment (surgical and aesthetic) has very intuitive interfaces and methods of use. It is necessary, as for all things, to practice to optimize their use, progressively reduce time and enhance their performance. They are within everyone’s reach but require a learning curve that varies according to the operator’s experience and the number of cases treated. The Digital Dentistry is a new figure of professional who has specific skills in the field, a qualification that requires continuous training. Digital will be the usual way of working because the dental supply chain goes in this direction.
Those who do not want to face change have as their only choice to close themselves to the future and unfortunately see the decline of their employment. For those who still have a few years of activity ahead of them, refractoriness (both in terms of learning curve and costs) can be understood and shared, but for those who have an entire career ahead of them it is a deliberate damage to their future (already extremely uncertain) to cling to the old analogue methodology.
BioService and Matrix have long been supporting and encouraging change by embracing the demands of dentists with the latest news in the industry offering advice and components for digital dentistry.

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Dental technician: a dying job?
dental technician blog bioservice matrix

Technology allows jobs to be carried out that are close to perfection and the workforce is disappearing. Automation is expected to be so high in the near future that a large proportion of many professions will change substantially. The introduction of digital technologies has been the main driver of the current revolution.
The latest report by the McKinsey Global Institute “A Future That Works: Automation, Employment, and Productivity”, confirms this trend: almost half (49%) of the work done today in the world by natural persons can be automated. Even in Italy, where the replacement rate would be between 49% and 51%. This means that more than half of Italian workers, about 11 million people, could be replaced by a machine. The World Economic Forum speaks of a loss of 7.1 million jobs by 2020, offset by a gain of two million jobs. Therefore, the negative balance is five million fewer jobs in the world within the next three years.
Crafts will be the most involved and affected by this orientation, followed by work at the counter as the cashier bank (eclipsed by home and mobile banking) or the insurer (overshadowed by online insurance), but also jobs in the operating room and in public services. The cash machine replaces the cashier, the ATM the bank at the counter, Amazon and Ali Baba (just to name the biggest giants) eclipse salespeople and sales agents, Booking the employees of hotels and travel agencies, email the postman, robots the workers, apps and websites the call centre phone operators, in fast food you order and pay via a touch screen, to buy a dress just click the virtual window on the computer screen and wait at home for delivery. There are many other examples of how computer science and its applications have changed the habits of life and disparate professional environments.
But we are here to talk about another profession that is inevitably seeing its stability falter: the dental technician. The profession of dental technician has always been of fundamental importance within the “dental chain”, so much so that it can be defined as irreplaceable and necessary, a central figure of prosthetic dentistry. To think that this profession and the related manufacture of prostheses are not part of this pressing trend towards the complete automation of production processes is by no means realistic. On the other hand, it is right to remember that all the knowledge, materials and techniques currently in the possession and use of dental laboratories have in turn been conceived and experimented with a view to evolution, as it is logical that they will be replaced and archived to leave room for novelty, in an inexorable life cycle that travels along the line of time and requires willingness to change and learning.
Is there a risk that the dental technician will no longer be the central figure in prosthetic fabrication? Who has been saved from the relentless advance of new technologies that replace the human hand with the “robotic arm” or high-performance machines?
The final question is how ready the dental technician is to take this epochal change, how open he is to new markets. The category was divided in half between those who invested and wanted to experience the future through 3D and those who, frightened by costs, learning curve and scepticism about the evolutionary path of the trade, remained faithful to the traditional technologies always had in their possession (delegating the delegable). Surely those who have managed to get on the “technology cart”, have invested in the future, created collaborations with colleagues and business networks to work in synergy, chosen evolutionary paths for their laboratory in a forward-looking and futuristic business perspective, are now floating and emerging.
First of all, you should be able to get the advance of knowledge and have mastered these new basic skills (the laboratory evolves and with it the figure of the professional), know how to take advantage of the time to make choices and investments, communication and sales strategies, propose and adapt to the changing needs of the market with processes with “high added value”. For example, there are those who have focused on medical devices tailored to the prevention of trauma (e.g. professional mouth guards for athletes, footballers, water polo players), there are those who have ridden the market of aesthetic dentistry or orthodontics. Increasing turnover without being stifled again by what is still called a crisis but which in reality could resemble more to a reticence to the “new landscape” and the “new” demands.
Putting aside what concerns learning and the propensity to change, it is right to point out that the 800 million euros of revenue that moves the Italian market of the dental sector (divided between studios and laboratories) have made the eye fall on the considerable presence of companies and centres that deal with 3D printing and CAD/CAM technologies. A market that no longer sees itself with the dental technician’s laboratory alone, but with the dominant presence of milling and laser melting centres.
As stated by the National Union of Italian Dental Industries, in collaboration with Key-Stone statistics, which commissioned the survey, the data show that 24% of dental laboratories rely on CAD/CAM production centres, preferring this working method to the traditional ones of the dental technician. The number of laboratories that decide to rely on these “digital centres” for the entire production process is increasing: from the design to the production of the works themselves.
It is right that the figure of the dental technician integrates in his professional routine techniques and CAD/CAM technologies, able to facilitate the work and the quality of the executions considering that the dental market is physiologically converting all the techniques and technologies, up to being almost completely digital. But are the historical figures of the supply chain (industries and suppliers, dental practices and dental laboratories) developing combined strategic-entrepreneurial actions? The answer is: not yet enough. It is necessary to ennoble the figure of the dental technician and to privilege the collaboration with the dental practices able to appreciate the quality of the Italian laboratories. At the level of business management, the aggregation of companies can be of great support, both to contain costs and to optimize resources and dominate a complex market.
The new technologies will require the inclusion of more technical and qualified professionals to manage the new systems. The training of professionals will be of fundamental and indispensable importance.

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The dentist at a crossroads between Past and Future
Past and Future of dentistry course bioservice matrix

The dentist at a crossroads between Past and Future

From analogue to digital…From digital to 4.0

The world of dentistry is overwhelmed by a series of changes
and it’s a lot more than we’ve ever seen before. The transition “from analog dentistry to dentistry
digital” is an overwhelming phase of development.
The general economic recovery, even if very weak, is still
accelerating all production processes.
This meeting is intended to be an opportunity to present products,
and strategies to capture the huge potential of the
opportunities that these changes are generating.
Most studies and laboratories are being “seduced” by companies
who often manage to sell them outdated products. In the digital sector, such
products age so quickly that many times it is difficult to find the right
to amortize its costs.
The objective of the course is to provide the information to really make
The opportunities offered by these instruments are rewarding.
they manage to grasp.

Speaker:
Enzo BortoliniAmm. Del. Bioservice S.r.l. – Matrix Implant Line

The meeting will be held in Reggio Emilia on May 10, 2018 at the headquarters of NUOVA DENT.

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