Tag Archives: 3D

3D digital technologies in dentistry
corso della bona odontoiatria digitale

3D digital technologies in dentistry: from diagnosis to multidisciplinary treatment

The aim of the meeting is to make known the real potential of the “DIGITAL” tools that technology makes available.
“The REAL value of the technologies lies in the KNOWLEDGE aimed at the concrete ability to use them and their cost is inversely proportional to this knowledge. Today the 3D software on the market able to support us has ridiculous costs; the most significant investment is represented by the LEARNING CURVE, which is therefore of fundamental importance”.
The issues that will be addressed:
– A brief historical note
– The learning of radiological knowledge (DIAGNOSIS AND 3D PLANNING)
– Digitization of production processes (DIGITAL WORKFLOW)
– How to design a supported prosthetic implant rehabilitation
– Augmented reality to virtually simulate operating phases and final results
– Problems with surgical guides and how to avoid them
– Clinical cases

Mr. Enrique Candel, graduated in Industrial Mechanics and Director of Research Development of the prosthetic and surgical planning software “Limaguide”, will be present at the course and will give information on the functions of the software. It will be possible to install “Limaguide” in a free version on your personal computer.

The course will be held by Dr. Angelo Della Bona, who works as a freelancer in Brescia and Cremona (www.dentalmedical-db.it).

The seminar will take place in Foggia on March 20, 2020 from 14:30 to 18:00 at the Aula Magna of the University Dental Clinic of Foggia.

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Digital in dentistry
digital guided surgery blog bioservice

When we talk about digital in dentistry, in reality we are not dealing with a completely new issue. Indeed, already in the mid-eighties these technologies were introduced into the practice of dentistry, but in the last decade their use has increased exponentially.
The modern techniques have changed the flow and sequence of work for the development of dental performance by changing the division of tasks and consequently the productivity of the working group.
Time is money! In this case, we can really say that digital technology has changed the work cycle with great benefits in terms of timing and predictability.
Before the advent of technology in the dental field, the sequence of work was marked by essential steps dictated by traditional methods. For those who use them are still the order of the day: the choice of physical supports, materials for the impression, the sending to the laboratory, the physical realization, the waiting while the technicians materialize and send everything back to the doctor, the verification of the work in test and finished (In some cases are necessary to make changes and it is necessary to repeat the operation of the impression). All these steps entail times and costs ranging from travel, to multiple sessions for the patient, and still waits while the dental technician modifies or resumes the work from scratch.
How much is Well-being worth? And how is the operator’s work optimized? What are the advantages to be gained in one’s work?
The fingerprint revolutionizes roles, times and costs.
The transition from conventional techniques to intraoral scanning has changed the experience of traditional impressions. 8Intraoral scanning requires that the impression made is fully digital and that it is processed directly by a software that manages both the oral scanning part and the subsequent improvement phase. All this takes place together with the patient, who becomes aware of the state of his mouth and what he needs thanks to the screen that shows in real time what the dentist is doing. Great professionalism and technology on the part of the doctor, the ability to monitor on screen for the patient, a direct and understandable channel that needs no explanation. Once this phase is over, we proceed to 3D printing, with very limited margins of error compared to the traditional method.
The procedure becomes much more comfortable and streamlined: for the patient who no longer has to suffer the discomfort of the impression with various materials (between coned and, not infrequently, sense of suffocation), for the elimination of consumables such as plaster, alginates, silicones (zero impact also from the environmental point of view), for the absence of errors considered the possibility of managing the digital file, for the shortened times given the elimination of the intermediate procedures of manufacture of the plaster model (also the data acquired through the scanner can be used by the studio to design the prosthesis with CAD/CAM technology).
What is the value of the patient’s time?
The question is rhetorical. Of course, the timing helps to determine the satisfaction of the patient, who will be all the more satisfied the fewer sessions he will have to face. The loss of time is matched by a loss of time in economic terms: work permits, miles from the dental office (if not nearby), transportation, parking, the baby sitter for children at home alone, and all other daily activities that need to be postponed or anticipated to make room for the appointment at the dentist.
And the doctor?
As far as the doctor is concerned, the supply chain is shortened and times are drastically reduced.
The fee: the fee that before seemed to be motivated by the presence of a longer chain (more steps with the laboratory, more frequent sessions), today is justified by the performance itself that has provided upstream an investment “important” to ensure efficiency, comfort and reduced time and on the other hand the learning curve of the professional who needs to learn, improve and master the digital technique.
The change
In conclusion, the process of approaching this reality must not be sudden and forced, the professional must have a clear understanding of how the progress of their study, what are the most requested services and based on the needs of the patient can invest in equipment and software technology most congenial to their business. Amortisation will be all the faster as the service provided by the digital technology chosen will be offered to the patient in an exhaustive manner.
You can’t stop or ignore innovation or manage it or suffer it. This teaches us history. The patient also has the opportunity to verify the information that his doctor provides; it is essential that these are in accordance with the evolution of the state of the art and are not limited to the techniques used by the dentist himself. Today the patient is very well informed even if the amount of information can paradoxically generate the same effect as the lack of information. For this reason, too, the doctor, today more than ever, plays an essential role for the patient, provided that he supplies objective information and always supported by scientific evidence.
In this way, the patient will become the best sounding board to advertise the study, breaking down the hesitations linked to the “value of the performance”.

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Guided Surgery
training session bioservice matrix

GUIDED SURGERY
The lies they tell you and the truths they hide from you.
The dental sector has always been a land of conquest for subjects who, in order to grab the sale, often tend to give incomplete information or worse, misleading, suggesting miraculous solutions.
BioService has always been at the forefront, trying to give simple, clear and unambiguous indications, providing its customers with adequate tools, so that they can decide in complete autonomy, aware of the importance of having a credible and reliable partner at their side.
FAST IMPLANT GUIDE 3D CLINICAL PROTOCOLS
(Traditional, Intraoral scan, Double scan)
Clinical cases
RADIOLOGY
Construction of the radiological template in the various cases of edentulousness
FAST IMPLANT GUIDE 3D SOFTWARE
Planning and Certification,
STL imports,
Alignments,
Universal Stent Registration,
Prosthetic concepts,
Clinical Cases
They’re going to intervene:
– Dr. Massimo Gamberoni – key account manager at Media Lab S.p.A.
– Dr. Tommaso Bocchetti – freelance – free lance
The congress will take place in Naples on May 9, 2019 at the Gold Millennium Hotel.

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Ignore, suffer or manage? How to respond to the digital revolution
digital blog bioservice matrix

The insert “Health” of Corriere della Sera dedicates an entire page to digital oral surgery focusing on words such as speed, safety, predictability.
The speeches that appear in the Special Health dedicated to the dental are by illustrious dentists who explain the technologies applied to their profession and that of their employees and colleagues. Here are some of the strengths of the new dental frontier highlighted in the dedicated column:
– the number of appointments that gradually decreases with a relative increase in comfort for the patient (saving in terms of time and money)
– the possibility of speeding up operations that previously required more sessions; this is also a benefit for the dentist who, through the use of technologies, can plan, operate quickly, accurately, precisely and with reduced margins of risk of error
– Surgery and therapy in total safety with the help of personalized surgical templates, designed on the computer and printed in 3D
– reduction of discomfort for the patient
– the scientific evidence in digital, i.e. the proven validity by the International Scientific Society that allows the use of these devices (scanners, cone beam computed tomography, milling machines and 3D printers)
This insert gives an idea of how, for example, guided implant surgery is of great help in aligning the “Craft” to the generalized computerizing of almost all existing jobs with obvious benefits on several fronts.
Digitization: why not?
Digital technologies have changed and will increasingly change the clinical practice of dentistry both from the diagnostic point of view (instrumental investigations such as CT Cone Beam, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography) and in the operational approach (CAD-CAM technologies, intraoral and laboratory scanners, 3D printers).
The digitization of the doctor’s office is an inevitable process, despite this growth does not seem to present relevant data to support the change (for example, the intraoral scanner to take impressions is present in less than 5% of dental practices).
As we mentioned some time ago, the problem of “dissemination” of this important and profitable innovation could be the initial investment and the chronic reluctance to change by the medical sector in question. It is clear that digital is present and applicable in every dental activity, particularly in radiological diagnostics, so much so that the digital design of prosthetic products has been the prerogative of dental technicians for years, and many of them are much more advanced than dentists in this field. Possession of these cutting-edge skills would bring undisputed advantages, especially to the new generations of Dentists and Dental Technicians who find it difficult to emerge in the sea of competition, but the resources seem to them insufficient in the face of the initial investment. But if you think that, in a single day of work, a trained professional can make interventions and products that previously required several sessions, it is obvious how to amortize an initial expense that seemed prohibitive. Reduction of time, costs, waste, but above all satisfied, paying, loyal patients who return, speak proudly of their dentist and expand the circle through word of mouth or sharing of various kinds (e.g.: social networks).
How does the social scenario change inside and outside the dental office? What do these “advanced practices” mean in terms of harmony within the dental practice team? And what benefits does the patient derive from outside?
The digital approach has significantly improved communication in the dental team between the various specialists and dental laboratories: the acquisition of multiple data (CBCT, intra- and extra-oral scans, virtual aesthetic and implant planning) has favoured the interpenetration of executions, integrating them in order to optimize the diagnostic process and monitor over time the changes in oral tissues and restorations.
The introduction of digital systems has also improved the relationship with patients who benefit from greater comfort considering the elimination of impression materials and the advantageous time management; it is possible to verify in real time the correctness of the impressions, to store the data no longer having the need to produce physical models and to carry out three-dimensional digital checks.
The possibility of commenting on the video on the virtual aesthetic planning of the “smile” together with the patients themselves, is certainly a motivational and communicative contribution not to be underestimated. Feeling so involved, patients willingly accept the treatments, limiting misunderstandings (concerning the therapeutic and economic treatment).
Are digital methods within everyone’s reach?
Do they require prolonged learning curves over time or are they easy to acquire?
Logically, it is right to report also some aspects that lead to mistrust in the approach to the “new”: in the common imagination, we speak of rather complex learning curves and significant investments with high costs. Although there is a fund of truth about the onerousness of training and instrumentation, virtual planning equipment (surgical and aesthetic) has very intuitive interfaces and methods of use. It is necessary, as for all things, to practice to optimize their use, progressively reduce time and enhance their performance. They are within everyone’s reach but require a learning curve that varies according to the operator’s experience and the number of cases treated. The Digital Dentistry is a new figure of professional who has specific skills in the field, a qualification that requires continuous training. Digital will be the usual way of working because the dental supply chain goes in this direction.
Those who do not want to face change have as their only choice to close themselves to the future and unfortunately see the decline of their employment. For those who still have a few years of activity ahead of them, refractoriness (both in terms of learning curve and costs) can be understood and shared, but for those who have an entire career ahead of them it is a deliberate damage to their future (already extremely uncertain) to cling to the old analogue methodology.
BioService and Matrix have long been supporting and encouraging change by embracing the demands of dentists with the latest news in the industry offering advice and components for digital dentistry.

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