“No! It is too expensive!”
fear estimate blog bioservice matrix

An uneasiness shared by both the patient and the dentist: the fear for the estimate.
We could say that in reality the fear of one is poured on the other. If a professional is literally afraid to submit his or her estimate to the patient (the most frequent hesitation is to present excessively expensive fees), he or she will certainly be wrong about the ways and forms because an honest and justified expense cannot be ignored if the patient’s needs have been endorsed upstream.
The patient presents himself to the study with certain expectations and objectives to be achieved. Anyone who sits in the dentist’s office chair already knows how they want to get out, and anyone who requests a service has a clear idea of what they want for themselves. The patient imagines the final outcome and on the basis of the variables of the case (such as time of execution and financial availability) decides on the proposal of the professional whether to carry out the therapy through a complete and definitive rehabilitation or proceed step by step. What he is not aware of are probably the technical aspects of the therapy, the possible physiological limits related to his clinical case.
The good dentist will be able to guarantee, through the person of his team delegated to the preparation of estimates, an estimate that reflects and embraces in full the real needs of the patient, whether they are related to the most obvious request that is the treatment of the disease, the aesthetic factor and function, up to the inevitable limits dictated by economic expenditure (absolutely binding for the purpose of accepting the estimate).
The figure who deals with interfacing with the patient to discuss together the amount of the final expenditure is not insignificant, it allows to separate the medical profession of the Doctor, compared to the purely economic / accounting context and has the opportunity in the preliminary meetings to intercept the needs of the patient integrating them to a rough analysis (but still well-founded) about the status of the person in front of him, a necessary moment in which we try to frame the individual so that we can take the most correct way to explain, motivate and propose the estimate.
Once the urgency, the necessity, the projection into the future of the patient and his “economic availability” have been understood, the suitable ways of treatment with the relative timing are submitted, always keeping in mind that the medical services provided are aimed at restoring the well-being of the entire organism and are not limited to the treatment of the teeth. The restoration of function and aesthetics are the final and most “visible” part of a much more complex and complex therapy, the result of careful and meticulous clinical investigations to assess every aspect of health as a whole. Only thanks to a careful and complete diagnosis by the dentist is it possible to carry out a personalized therapy because each person is unique and as such must be treated and satisfied.
If we want to talk about the modus operandi, the professional should prefer a modular approach (various stages) rather than an overall one (everything and immediately). In recent years the doctor-patient relationship has changed, once the word of the doctor was incontrovertible and the patient trusted, or had to rely blindly on the hands of their trusted dentist. In today’s scenario, where information and competition have altered the parameters of choice, the far-sighted dentist must find a way to explain, convince and operate in all honesty and transparency. Each patient is unique and as such needs to be treated, the doctor must reason in a targeted manner, motivate one line rather than another, ensure the result by embracing the needs of the patient and then make them coincide with the economic availability.

With regard to financial management, one is led to think that the first and only parameter taken into account by the patient is the amount of the fee. In reality, it is only partially correct. Of course, the advertising that stands out on the windows of low-cost chains that promise low-cost performance attracts, but at the same time how can you promise a therapy, and a performance, without a proper diagnosis? Without having seen what clinical condition the patient is in? Without knowing exactly what his expectations are? Without these essential elements it becomes almost impossible to propose targeted, effective solutions, able to fully meet the patient’s expectations.
The dentist must be aware of the fact that the difference is not the estimate but the listening of the patient that leads to intercept the best and most suitable “care” according to expectations and possibilities. It is not certain that a patient does not accept an “important” estimate, perhaps deferred over time, by virtue of the predictable final yield, rather than an estimate “below cost” which in fact does not allow the patient to be treated in the best possible way.

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Patient or Customer?
patient or customer blog bioservice Matrix

Patient or costumer? …simply two sides of the same coin!
Let’s analyse the two words that make up the dichotomy.
Patient means “person affected by a disease, and more generally, who is entrusted to the care of a doctor or a surgeon”, while customer in current use is “who usually uses the services of someone or buys what he needs from the same supplier” (Italian Dictionary).
In the light of the definitions it seems easy to assert that, since the dentist is a doctor, the people who turn to him are his patients as a result. But how much have the patient’s requests and the service provided by the dentist changed?
The dentist knows that the patient has much wider demands than “simple pain treatment” so it ranges from aesthetics to orthodontics. The practitioner decides to invest money and time with equipment and learning curve to satisfy the wishes of the patient who gradually becomes more and more “customer” given the varied demands that go beyond pathologies. It requires a service, weighs the costs and analyses them from an economic point of view. Certainly the best thing to do is not to catalogue or label, it will be the request itself that will make the individual a patient or a client. The patient has a painful problem that he wants to eradicate by relying on the wise hands of his doctor, the customer has intentions and evaluates the economic exchange to meet needs or desires.
It seems almost as if the two roles are intertwined: there are alternating phases in which the individual demonstrates to calculate, to choose in a very careful way, and this denotes typical traits from the client, then the phase in which the individual makes contact with the doctor and listens to him in the diagnosis and in the proposed line of care, and the figure of the patient is outlined, when it comes to estimates, it is natural to emerge again the trait of the purchaser. All in all, it is nothing more than a mix of both figures that alternate by weighing costs and benefits, quantity and quality.
From the ethical point of view of the medical profession, it is advisable to attribute the term “patient” to the individual because of the service provided by the doctor himself at the time of need. Having said this, the new frontiers (demands) in the dental field have shifted the horizon of the dental profession, widening the margins of work and profit for the dentist, who inevitably has to make use of prudent marketing strategies to propose his services while maintaining intact the ethical sense and a correct perception of the real state of health of the patient himself.
The person has multiple needs and the dentist can find a way to accommodate them: the patient requires care, attention, seriousness, professionalism, continuity; the client asks for prices (check the rates and compare them), convenience (the location of the office, if it is more or less easy to get there and park), timing (number of sessions, speed of execution), avant-garde (the latest techniques in use to be sure to get the best results), modernity (there is a need to develop the office and follow the trends of the moment regarding image and dental aesthetics).
The spectrum of relationships has expanded but the focus remains on the individual and his needs, whether as a patient or client.

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Rehabilitation of FULL ARC
Rehabilitation of FULL ARC training meeting education

Rehabilitation of FULL ARC with post-extraction implantation technique and immediate loading on six implants in live surgery.
More and more often the patient knows how important it is to rely on professionals who can definitively solve his problems. Restoring the function and aesthetics of implanted prosthetic care is only the final and most “visible” part of a much more complex and complex therapy.
The aim of the course is to present an advanced prosthetic implant therapy live with simple and reproducible techniques.
Speaker:
– Dr. Antonio Perasole – freelance –
The course will be held in Portici (Na) on March 9, 2019 at the Studio Dentistico of Dr. Perasole.

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