Digital in dentistry
digital guided surgery blog bioservice

When we talk about digital in dentistry, in reality we are not dealing with a completely new issue. Indeed, already in the mid-eighties these technologies were introduced into the practice of dentistry, but in the last decade their use has increased exponentially.
The modern techniques have changed the flow and sequence of work for the development of dental performance by changing the division of tasks and consequently the productivity of the working group.
Time is money! In this case, we can really say that digital technology has changed the work cycle with great benefits in terms of timing and predictability.
Before the advent of technology in the dental field, the sequence of work was marked by essential steps dictated by traditional methods. For those who use them are still the order of the day: the choice of physical supports, materials for the impression, the sending to the laboratory, the physical realization, the waiting while the technicians materialize and send everything back to the doctor, the verification of the work in test and finished (In some cases are necessary to make changes and it is necessary to repeat the operation of the impression). All these steps entail times and costs ranging from travel, to multiple sessions for the patient, and still waits while the dental technician modifies or resumes the work from scratch.
How much is Well-being worth? And how is the operator’s work optimized? What are the advantages to be gained in one’s work?
The fingerprint revolutionizes roles, times and costs.
The transition from conventional techniques to intraoral scanning has changed the experience of traditional impressions. 8Intraoral scanning requires that the impression made is fully digital and that it is processed directly by a software that manages both the oral scanning part and the subsequent improvement phase. All this takes place together with the patient, who becomes aware of the state of his mouth and what he needs thanks to the screen that shows in real time what the dentist is doing. Great professionalism and technology on the part of the doctor, the ability to monitor on screen for the patient, a direct and understandable channel that needs no explanation. Once this phase is over, we proceed to 3D printing, with very limited margins of error compared to the traditional method.
The procedure becomes much more comfortable and streamlined: for the patient who no longer has to suffer the discomfort of the impression with various materials (between coned and, not infrequently, sense of suffocation), for the elimination of consumables such as plaster, alginates, silicones (zero impact also from the environmental point of view), for the absence of errors considered the possibility of managing the digital file, for the shortened times given the elimination of the intermediate procedures of manufacture of the plaster model (also the data acquired through the scanner can be used by the studio to design the prosthesis with CAD/CAM technology).
What is the value of the patient’s time?
The question is rhetorical. Of course, the timing helps to determine the satisfaction of the patient, who will be all the more satisfied the fewer sessions he will have to face. The loss of time is matched by a loss of time in economic terms: work permits, miles from the dental office (if not nearby), transportation, parking, the baby sitter for children at home alone, and all other daily activities that need to be postponed or anticipated to make room for the appointment at the dentist.
And the doctor?
As far as the doctor is concerned, the supply chain is shortened and times are drastically reduced.
The fee: the fee that before seemed to be motivated by the presence of a longer chain (more steps with the laboratory, more frequent sessions), today is justified by the performance itself that has provided upstream an investment “important” to ensure efficiency, comfort and reduced time and on the other hand the learning curve of the professional who needs to learn, improve and master the digital technique.
The change
In conclusion, the process of approaching this reality must not be sudden and forced, the professional must have a clear understanding of how the progress of their study, what are the most requested services and based on the needs of the patient can invest in equipment and software technology most congenial to their business. Amortisation will be all the faster as the service provided by the digital technology chosen will be offered to the patient in an exhaustive manner.
You can’t stop or ignore innovation or manage it or suffer it. This teaches us history. The patient also has the opportunity to verify the information that his doctor provides; it is essential that these are in accordance with the evolution of the state of the art and are not limited to the techniques used by the dentist himself. Today the patient is very well informed even if the amount of information can paradoxically generate the same effect as the lack of information. For this reason, too, the doctor, today more than ever, plays an essential role for the patient, provided that he supplies objective information and always supported by scientific evidence.
In this way, the patient will become the best sounding board to advertise the study, breaking down the hesitations linked to the “value of the performance”.

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Cemented and screw-retained prosthesis on implants: when, how, why
Cemented and screw-retained prosthetis education bioservice matrix

Cemented and screw-retained prosthesis on implants: when, how, why
Indications and contraindications
In the last thirty years, everything has been said about the advantages and disadvantages of implant prosthetics. Often there have been techniques that have been “trend-setting” but then proved unsuitable for specific clinical situations.
The aim of the course is to highlight the advantages and limitations of the various systems for anchoring prostheses on implants, providing useful indications for correct and lasting prosthetic planning.
Speaker:
Dr. Paolo Brunamonti Binello – freelancer –
-Medical Director of the Complex Structure of Level II of the Department of Dentistry at the Galliera Hospitals of Genoa
-Contract Professor of the Master’s Degree Course in Dentistry and Dental Prosthetics
-Contract Professor of the Degree Course in Dental Hygiene at the Faculty of Medicine and Surgery of the University of Genoa
The course will be held in Genoa on 23 May 2019 at the Palazzo Ducale (Sala “Le Cisterne del Ducale”).

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Guided Surgery
training session bioservice matrix

GUIDED SURGERY
The lies they tell you and the truths they hide from you.
The dental sector has always been a land of conquest for subjects who, in order to grab the sale, often tend to give incomplete information or worse, misleading, suggesting miraculous solutions.
BioService has always been at the forefront, trying to give simple, clear and unambiguous indications, providing its customers with adequate tools, so that they can decide in complete autonomy, aware of the importance of having a credible and reliable partner at their side.
FAST IMPLANT GUIDE 3D CLINICAL PROTOCOLS
(Traditional, Intraoral scan, Double scan)
Clinical cases
RADIOLOGY
Construction of the radiological template in the various cases of edentulousness
FAST IMPLANT GUIDE 3D SOFTWARE
Planning and Certification,
STL imports,
Alignments,
Universal Stent Registration,
Prosthetic concepts,
Clinical Cases
They’re going to intervene:
– Dr. Massimo Gamberoni – key account manager at Media Lab S.p.A.
– Dr. Tommaso Bocchetti – freelance – free lance
The congress will take place in Naples on May 9, 2019 at the Gold Millennium Hotel.

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More than dentistry
Blog bioservice Matrix

When we talk about innovation in the field of dentistry, our mind leads us straight to think about the epoch-making change that the sector is experiencing thanks to the digitalization of processes, from diagnosis to therapy (Editor’s note). There is another important element whose implications are perhaps even more determined for the patient: the innovation of and in communication. An aspect still little considered by most, but which is radically changing the approach, and consequently the choice, of patients towards the dentist. Today we face one of these many aspects that are hidden behind the generic “Dental Marketing”. We are talking about experiential marketing that is changing the world of dentistry, generating significant benefits, including economic ones, for the patient and the practice.
Let’s cite some cases as examples in which dental practices have decided to innovate by promoting themselves thanks to collateral services that have been able to make a difference and divert patients to “their door”.
First example: Dental studies have thought of providing extra services in addition to what is strictly due to Dentistry and has offered collateral services of great value as allergy tests and for food intolerances, Kinesiology and Osteopathy. In particular, the latter two disciplines are aimed at the balance of the entire body-mind system. The areas examined to rebalance this system include learning, understanding, movement, motor coordination, the perceptual/sensory area and the organic area and promote biochemical, nutritional, physical, structural, mental and emotional balancing. The patient is analysed as an integrated system of devices that are in close dependence on each other. This corresponds to holistic medicine that does not separate mind and body in care. All these disciplines are very much in vogue and appreciated by patients who care about well-being and are attracted by the interpenetration of the two medical spheres. The result has been a much more frequent affiliation and constancy in care.
Second example: Patient services are implemented with a focus on aesthetic and cosmetic dentistry. There is a whole range of patients who ask their dentist for help in improving their “beauty”.
Aesthetic dentistry is the study and realization of dental restorations that restore or improve the aesthetic appearance. Cosmetics, on the other hand, concerns that part of therapies that aim to improve the appearance of one or more dental elements, oral and perioral tissues, the whitening of pigmented teeth, “dental piercings”, etc…
The patient is enormously attracted by everything that orbits around beauty and body care, even when the surgery is a “habit” and not a necessity.

Third example: it contrasts with the old aseptic models of study, which sketch a comfortable waiting room even if most of the time has the appearance of an antechamber of pain not very bright, with ticking clocks, and few contributions to the amusement of the mind.
It is a study that has marked the working activity according to the “passions” of its patients: Monday, after Sunday of sports matches, is completely dedicated to men! The waiting room is a sort of convivial situation in which newspapers, magazines and speeches focus on the criticism of the previous championship day. Time passes quickly and waiting becomes pleasant, to exchange the last impression on this or that other player, result, goal, purchase, card, bet.
Another day of the week is dedicated to women, the waiting room is filled with female voices and the plus is made up of a professional who on site performs the job of beautician and cheers the wait with tricks and enamels.
Other time bands are dedicated to children, who find themselves in a room that takes on the appearance of a room for games in which the thought of the dentist is sweetened by books, colours and many small peers.
By satisfying every age group, following the general lines of common interests, the office has managed to recreate a jovial environment in which sociality and care of the mind fill waiting times and worries.
Conclusions: these three examples of “strategic moves” certainly cost the study a different and “innovative” organization, by virtue of the final yield, the full satisfaction of the patient and his precious time. We can therefore say that varying and expanding our services, aiming at aesthetics, care of the mind and body, following the passions of our patients, guarantees an enormous return in terms of reputation, affiliation and word of mouth.

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“No! It is too expensive!”
fear estimate blog bioservice matrix

An uneasiness shared by both the patient and the dentist: the fear for the estimate.
We could say that in reality the fear of one is poured on the other. If a professional is literally afraid to submit his or her estimate to the patient (the most frequent hesitation is to present excessively expensive fees), he or she will certainly be wrong about the ways and forms because an honest and justified expense cannot be ignored if the patient’s needs have been endorsed upstream.
The patient presents himself to the study with certain expectations and objectives to be achieved. Anyone who sits in the dentist’s office chair already knows how they want to get out, and anyone who requests a service has a clear idea of what they want for themselves. The patient imagines the final outcome and on the basis of the variables of the case (such as time of execution and financial availability) decides on the proposal of the professional whether to carry out the therapy through a complete and definitive rehabilitation or proceed step by step. What he is not aware of are probably the technical aspects of the therapy, the possible physiological limits related to his clinical case.
The good dentist will be able to guarantee, through the person of his team delegated to the preparation of estimates, an estimate that reflects and embraces in full the real needs of the patient, whether they are related to the most obvious request that is the treatment of the disease, the aesthetic factor and function, up to the inevitable limits dictated by economic expenditure (absolutely binding for the purpose of accepting the estimate).
The figure who deals with interfacing with the patient to discuss together the amount of the final expenditure is not insignificant, it allows to separate the medical profession of the Doctor, compared to the purely economic / accounting context and has the opportunity in the preliminary meetings to intercept the needs of the patient integrating them to a rough analysis (but still well-founded) about the status of the person in front of him, a necessary moment in which we try to frame the individual so that we can take the most correct way to explain, motivate and propose the estimate.
Once the urgency, the necessity, the projection into the future of the patient and his “economic availability” have been understood, the suitable ways of treatment with the relative timing are submitted, always keeping in mind that the medical services provided are aimed at restoring the well-being of the entire organism and are not limited to the treatment of the teeth. The restoration of function and aesthetics are the final and most “visible” part of a much more complex and complex therapy, the result of careful and meticulous clinical investigations to assess every aspect of health as a whole. Only thanks to a careful and complete diagnosis by the dentist is it possible to carry out a personalized therapy because each person is unique and as such must be treated and satisfied.
If we want to talk about the modus operandi, the professional should prefer a modular approach (various stages) rather than an overall one (everything and immediately). In recent years the doctor-patient relationship has changed, once the word of the doctor was incontrovertible and the patient trusted, or had to rely blindly on the hands of their trusted dentist. In today’s scenario, where information and competition have altered the parameters of choice, the far-sighted dentist must find a way to explain, convince and operate in all honesty and transparency. Each patient is unique and as such needs to be treated, the doctor must reason in a targeted manner, motivate one line rather than another, ensure the result by embracing the needs of the patient and then make them coincide with the economic availability.

With regard to financial management, one is led to think that the first and only parameter taken into account by the patient is the amount of the fee. In reality, it is only partially correct. Of course, the advertising that stands out on the windows of low-cost chains that promise low-cost performance attracts, but at the same time how can you promise a therapy, and a performance, without a proper diagnosis? Without having seen what clinical condition the patient is in? Without knowing exactly what his expectations are? Without these essential elements it becomes almost impossible to propose targeted, effective solutions, able to fully meet the patient’s expectations.
The dentist must be aware of the fact that the difference is not the estimate but the listening of the patient that leads to intercept the best and most suitable “care” according to expectations and possibilities. It is not certain that a patient does not accept an “important” estimate, perhaps deferred over time, by virtue of the predictable final yield, rather than an estimate “below cost” which in fact does not allow the patient to be treated in the best possible way.

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Patient or Customer?
patient or customer blog bioservice Matrix

Patient or costumer? …simply two sides of the same coin!
Let’s analyse the two words that make up the dichotomy.
Patient means “person affected by a disease, and more generally, who is entrusted to the care of a doctor or a surgeon”, while customer in current use is “who usually uses the services of someone or buys what he needs from the same supplier” (Italian Dictionary).
In the light of the definitions it seems easy to assert that, since the dentist is a doctor, the people who turn to him are his patients as a result. But how much have the patient’s requests and the service provided by the dentist changed?
The dentist knows that the patient has much wider demands than “simple pain treatment” so it ranges from aesthetics to orthodontics. The practitioner decides to invest money and time with equipment and learning curve to satisfy the wishes of the patient who gradually becomes more and more “customer” given the varied demands that go beyond pathologies. It requires a service, weighs the costs and analyses them from an economic point of view. Certainly the best thing to do is not to catalogue or label, it will be the request itself that will make the individual a patient or a client. The patient has a painful problem that he wants to eradicate by relying on the wise hands of his doctor, the customer has intentions and evaluates the economic exchange to meet needs or desires.
It seems almost as if the two roles are intertwined: there are alternating phases in which the individual demonstrates to calculate, to choose in a very careful way, and this denotes typical traits from the client, then the phase in which the individual makes contact with the doctor and listens to him in the diagnosis and in the proposed line of care, and the figure of the patient is outlined, when it comes to estimates, it is natural to emerge again the trait of the purchaser. All in all, it is nothing more than a mix of both figures that alternate by weighing costs and benefits, quantity and quality.
From the ethical point of view of the medical profession, it is advisable to attribute the term “patient” to the individual because of the service provided by the doctor himself at the time of need. Having said this, the new frontiers (demands) in the dental field have shifted the horizon of the dental profession, widening the margins of work and profit for the dentist, who inevitably has to make use of prudent marketing strategies to propose his services while maintaining intact the ethical sense and a correct perception of the real state of health of the patient himself.
The person has multiple needs and the dentist can find a way to accommodate them: the patient requires care, attention, seriousness, professionalism, continuity; the client asks for prices (check the rates and compare them), convenience (the location of the office, if it is more or less easy to get there and park), timing (number of sessions, speed of execution), avant-garde (the latest techniques in use to be sure to get the best results), modernity (there is a need to develop the office and follow the trends of the moment regarding image and dental aesthetics).
The spectrum of relationships has expanded but the focus remains on the individual and his needs, whether as a patient or client.

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Rehabilitation of FULL ARC
Rehabilitation of FULL ARC training meeting education

Rehabilitation of FULL ARC with post-extraction implantation technique and immediate loading on six implants in live surgery.
More and more often the patient knows how important it is to rely on professionals who can definitively solve his problems. Restoring the function and aesthetics of implanted prosthetic care is only the final and most “visible” part of a much more complex and complex therapy.
The aim of the course is to present an advanced prosthetic implant therapy live with simple and reproducible techniques.
Speaker:
– Dr. Antonio Perasole – freelance –
The course will be held in Portici (Na) on March 9, 2019 at the Studio Dentistico of Dr. Perasole.

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